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7 Ways You Can Help Self-Storage Tenants Get Organized in 2016

When it comes to packing and moving, many people throw all their belongings in big boxes and stack them haphazardly in their self-storage unit. But this disorganized method often leads to frustration when they can’t find their important belongings in the chaos. Use these seven tips to help your tenants organize their belongings inside their unit and avoid stressful moving situations.

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December 24, 2015

4 Min Read
7 Ways You Can Help Self-Storage Tenants Get Organized in 2016

By Jonathan Deesing 

When it comes to packing and moving, many people throw all their belongings in big boxes and stack them haphazardly in their self-storage unit. But this disorganized method leads to frustration in the future when they can’t find their important belongings in the chaos.

Self-storage operators can save tenants from this exasperating experience by providing organization suggestions and solutions to make their units more structured. Use these seven tips to help your tenants organize their belongings and avoid stressful moving situations in 2016.   

Provide Label Makers

Boxes properly marked with standard labels are easier to organize and find. To encourage this structured organization system, invest in reliable label makers and loan them out to new tenants. You can even use this as an incentive to encourage new leases or make extra cash by renting them. In addition to one large label that marks where these items go in the home, provide an inventory sheet that can be attached to each box.

For an extra layer of organization, offer tenants “fragile” stickers. These labels can help them protect their less-durable belongings from getting damaged during a move. They can also help tenants better organize their storage space. You should also suggest they put boxes marked “fragile” toward the back of the unit where they won’t be moved about if the tenant needs to sort through other items in the future.  

Sell Packing Materials

Many self-storage operators sell packing materials. This not only enables them to generate more money, but also provides their tenants with a valuable service. During move-in, many people find they need to repack boxes in order to stack them without harming the contents. You can help your customers stay organized by carrying an array of packing materials, such as packing peanuts, heavy-duty tape, bubble wrap and protective plastic sheeting. Mothballs are also a great resource for people who are storing clothes. 

Offer a Variety of Boxes       

Whether they need plastic tubs to keep items airtight or plain cardboard boxes, providing customers with a variety of options gives them flexibility to organize all their goods as efficiently as possible. When deciding what boxes to offer, think about what sizes will fit best in your storage units. Smaller boxes may be preferable, as they help keep items in organized groups that can be quickly sorted through. Stock hanging-clothes boxes that tenants can use to organize their clothing efficiently, and keep their wardrobe clean and wrinkle-free.  

Consider Shelving Options

Help folks get the most out of the space in their units by providing fitted shelving options. Find what sizes fit your units and keep these shelving solutions on hand for purchase or rental. In addition to selling the shelves, you can offer to install them when someone moves in for a fee. Customized shelves create more room on the ground and a better organized space.

Also, consider selling or renting wooden pallets. Pallets keep boxes from sitting directly on the floor and help better protect your tenants’ belongings. Pallets can be expensive, but may be a good investment for tenants who plan to rent a unit for a longer period of time.  

Create Layout Maps for Units

Encourage your customers to make an itemized list of all their belongings in the unit so they have a detailed assessment of everything packed. Print a diagram of the storage space tenants can mark and reference later to see where an item is located in the unit. Remember, many of your customers will be first-time renters, so they’re unaware of how to properly use the storage space. Use your knowledge to guide them.  

Offer Advice on Storing Heavy-Duty Equipment

You’ve probably seen enough to know what works best in packing and arranging boxes for storage. Give suggestions based off your experience, such as how to pack and store large equipment like lawnmowers and power tools. These items can cause damage and a hazard if they’re not properly drained of fluids and cleaned before being put in storage.

Bulky hardware and yardwork equipment should be stored on a tarp or plastic sheeting to protect the floor from stains. A second sheet can also help protect other goods from any dirt or residue that could lead to stains or irreparable damage. Always make sure you inform your tenants which items are prohibited from being stored in units.  

Refer Tenants to Dependable Moving Companies

Many people don’t know who to trust or if they’re getting a good deal from a moving company. By providing a list of movers you consider trustworthy, you give your tenants a little more peace of mind during their move. Make sure to properly vet the moving companies you list before making any suggestions. In return, these companies can refer their customers to your facility for their storage needs.

By providing your knowledge to tenants and offering materials that will improve their storage organization, you can prevent headaches and complaints. Plus, it’s good customer service, and you’re tenants will appreciate your expertise.   

Jonathan Deesing is a packing and organization specialist with imove.com, where he spends most of his time building box forts. For more moving tips, check out imove's moving resources

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