Self-Storage Startup Stuf Co-Founder Named to ‘Inc.’ 2022 ‘Female Founders 100’ List

Katharine Lau, CEO and co-founder of Stuf, a startup business that partners with commercial-property owners to convert unused space to self-storage, has been named to “Inc.” magazine’s fifth annual “Female Founders 100” list. The list honors women for their corporate innovation and ideas. The companies connected to those recognized this year are estimated to be worth more than $22 billion, according to a press release.

“These 100 female founders have identified solutions to difficult problems and created valuable, industry-changing companies out of them,” said Scott Omelianuk, the magazine’s editor-in-chief. “We congratulate this year’s list on their achievements and look forward to their continued success.”

Under Lau’s leadership, Stuf has grown more than 300% year-over-year since launching in December 2020 with a single location in San Francisco. The company now operates locations in Atlanta, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and Washington, D.C., with plans for further expansion, the release stated.

“I'm honored to be recognized alongside these brilliant and inspiring women who are pioneering innovative businesses across every sector and changing the face of entrepreneurship,” Lau said. “Seeing our own business transform from a few storage units to a national network is incredibly fulfilling, and I'm proud of what our team has accomplished in less than two years.”

Based in New York, Stuf initially launched after raising $1.8 million in seed funding. Last August, it expanded its footprint in Northern California by adding two facilities comprising 179,000 square feet. Footprint growth this year includes adding space inside two Southern California facilities comprising about 6,800 square feet.

Source: PR Newswire, Stuf CEO and Co-Founder, Katharine Lau, Named to Inc.’s 2022 Female Founders 100 List

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