Self-Storage Horror Film Storage 24 Bombs at U.S. Box Office

Self-storage has been the subject of several popular reality-television shows and even a handful of movies in recent months, but British horror film Storage 24 had the unenviable distinction of being the lowest-grossing movie at the U.S. box office last year, earning just $72 and lasting a single day.

Self-storage has been the subject of several popular reality-television shows and even a handful of movies in recent months, but British horror film Storage 24 had the unenviable distinction of being the lowest-grossing movie at the U.S. box office last year, earning just $72 and lasting a single day.

One explanation for the dismal showing was a supposedly planned one-day viewing at a single American theater as part of a larger deal to get the movie on U.S. television, according to the source. Storage 24 cost about £1.6 million to make and reportedly earned £225,000 after it was released in the United Kingdom in June 2012.

British filmmaker Noel Clarke co-wrote the script and cast himself in the lead role. In the movie, Clarkes character is trapped in a London storage facility with his girlfriend, and the couple gets terrorized by an alien creature who wants to eat them. The movie also stars Antonia Campbell-Hughes, Laura Haddock, Colin O'Donoghue and Jamie Thomas King.

Clarke was reportedly bullish about the potential for an American audience for Storage 24, encouraged by the stateside success of Adulthood, an earlier movie he wrote, directed and starred in. It is unclear if the film could still make its way to American television. Last year, U.S. viewers created a social media sensation out of the low-budget, made-for-TV horror film Sharknado, which aired on SyFy.

New DVD copies of Storage 24 are currently selling for $14.99 on Amazon.com. The film has received 60 public reviews on the website, averaging three stars.

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