1784 Capital Holdings Breaks Ground on $10 Million Self-Storage Facility in Oro Valley, AZ

Update 3/7/18 – 1784 Capital Holdings has broken ground on its new storage facility in Oro Valley. The three-story property at 11061 N. Oracle Road is expected to open by the end of the year, according to a press release. The $10 million development will be managed by Life Storage Inc., a self-storage real estate investment trust and property-management company.

The facility will contain three floors above ground and one below. Amenities will include a customer lounge, children’s play area, individually alarmed units and video cameras.

“We were drawn to Oro Valley because of the area’s thoughtful development policies and dedication to community integrity,” said Shane Albers, CEO and chairman of 1784 Capital. “We feel privileged to be a part of this community, and we look forward to providing a state-of-the-art environment that elevates consumers’ self-storage experience while continuing to raise industry standards.”

The property is near Oro Valley’s Innovation Park, a master-planned business development that’s home to Honeywell, Northwest Medical Center and several pharmaceutical companies. “Oro Valley is emerging as a regional center for the biotech industry, and these growing companies are expanding the local population,” said Kelly McKone, executive vice president of real estate for 1784 Capital. “Many of these professionals move to the area for a limited time and are in need of quality self-storage to enhance their lifestyle.”


3/24/17 – The Oro Valley Town Council has unanimously removed a restriction against indoor self-storage facilities in Steam Pump Village and approved the architectural concept and parking for the storage project proposed by developer 1784 Capital Holdings LLC. The company intends to build a 107,000-square-foot structure, with 80,000 square feet reserved for self-storage. It will offer more than 700 climate-controlled units, according to the source.

Landscaping plans include natural features along Cañada Del Oro Wash and connectivity to a multi-use trail that will feature a roof trellis.

The council’s decision followed approvals by the conceptual design review board and planning and zoning commission. The favorable view runs contrary to the town’s planned area development guidelines adopted in 1996, which didn’t permit self-storage. The use was specifically prohibited from the ordinance in 2011, the source reported.

The willingness of 1784 Capital and RKAA Architects Inc. to design a facility to fit in with the aesthetics of the community helped make the proposal a “unique project” for Steam Pump, according to Bayer Vella, town planning manager and planning and zoning administrator.

Seven residents and business owners spoke against the project during the March 15 meeting. Those in opposition included Chris Monson, owner of Arizona Self Storage, and Edna Castaneda, facility manager of the company’s Oro Valley location. Both contended the traffic estimates provided by the developer were too light. Keri Silvyn, an attorney representing 1784 Capital, estimated the facility would draw up to 12 visits per day, but Castaneda and Monson indicated Arizona Self-Storage facilities average between 35 and 50 cars per day, with the Oro Valley location experiencing up to 90 visits daily. Oro Valley officials used traffic figures provided by public works director Paul Keesler, which estimated 132 trips per day with a peak of 14 per hour, the source reported.

There are two self-storage facilities within a one-mile radius of the building site.

Some residents also argued against the aesthetics of the building and raised concerns about traffic safety due to the property’s proximity to a BASIS charter school.


2/20/17 – The Oro Valley, Ariz., Planning and Zoning Commission on Feb. 7 voted unanimously to recommend a self-storage proposal for the Steam Pump Village development area. The three-story facility would be built on more than 1 acre north of Steam Pump Ranch and west of a Quick Trip gas station. As designed, the building would be 48 feet tall and resemble an office building to fit the intended use of the site, according to the source. The ground floor would preserve 3,800 square feet for office or retail use.

The commission supported the project despite residential opposition and a self-storage exclusion rule that was adopted in 1988 as part of the Planned Area Development plan for the property. The design submitted to the town includes faux windows and colors consistent with nearby development, the source reported.

“The stated intent of not permitting mini-storage facilities was to maintain a high-quality development and to prohibit uses that are not compatible with the site,” principal planner Chad Daines told the commission. “Historically, mini-storage facilities have consisted of long, linear buildings with roll-up doors and units that are accessed by drive aisles. These facilities have evolved over the years to include indoor, climate-controlled facilities; and with proper design, these facilities can have more of an office appearance and can be compatible with retail development, such as the Steam Pump Village development.”

The application asks for a change in parking standard and an increase in allowable floor area ratio, according to the source. The project would be restricted from having “outdoor rental displays or activity, corporate graphics or activity from within the units.”

Among the concerns raised by residents were parking, safety at the facility, lack of sales-tax revenue and increased traffic. Several residents also suggested turning the property into a park.

The proposal must still be addressed by the conceptual design review board and town council.

Sources:
Tucson Local Media, Oro Valley Unanimously Removes Storage Prohibition for Single Property Within Steam Pump Village
Tucson Local Media, Planning and Zoning Gives Go Ahead on Storage Facility at Steam Pump Ranch Application Still Needs to Make the Rounds Through Another Board and Town Council

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