Inside Self-Storage is part of the Informa Markets Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Centerville, OH, Adopts Tighter Self-Storage Building Restrictions

Tighter restrictions on self-storage development are set to go into effect in Centerville, Ohio, on Oct. 13. The new rules will limit the amount of self-storage that can be built in the city’s two industrial zoning districts as well as lot size and proximity to similar businesses. They’ll effectively end a temporary, one-year ban on self-storage projects that was adopted in January, according to the source.

The regulations will apply to new self-storage developments and expansion projects. Storage businesses will be limited to lots of 3 acres or smaller and will not be allowed to occupy more than 8% of the city’s industrial districts. They must also be more than 1,000 feet from any similar enterprise, the source reported.

In addition, stored property will be restricted to enclosed buildings, and facilities must have ample security, including fences and walls constructed from “high-quality materials” that are compatible with the building design.

Officials enacted the moratorium on self-storage development after they deemed it fell short of producing enough jobs for the amount of land it occupies. The use already comprises about 18 acres within the city’s industrial zones and creates about one job for every 5.25 acres. “Industrial properties typically produce 10 jobs for every one acre,” city planner Mark Yandrick told the source. “That’s a 50 times difference for what a typical industrial property has for jobs and a tax base than a self-storage facility would have.”

Officials crafted the new regulations after reviewing development guidelines used in Kettering, Miamisburg and Parma, Ohio.

Source:
Dayton Daily News, New Centerville Self-Storage Businesses Face Stricter Rules as Ban Lift Nears

Hide comments
account-default-image

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish