Safelock Storage Plans Self-Storage Development in Owasso, OK

Update 1/20/16 – The Owasso Planning Commission last week recommended the city council approve the Safelock self-storage proposal submitted by developer Tony Bruce. The storage facility would be the first for Bruce after a career as a professional sprint-car driver, according to the source.

Update 1/20/16 – The Owasso Planning Commission last week recommended the city council approve the Safelock self-storage proposal submitted by developer Tony Bruce. The storage facility would be the first for Bruce after a career as a professional sprint-car driver, according to the source.

Bruce plans to offer up to 450 self-storage units with room for future expansion. “We’re moving forward with Safelock Mini Storage,” he told the source. “I’ve been a pro race-car driver for 20 years, had some friends who have always wanted to get into something like this, and some racing sponsors who were able to help me.”

The developer indicated he’s also interested in other types of commercial real estate. “It’s my first go-around for developmental stuff,” Bruce said. “We want to walk before we can run here, and hopefully it works out where we can do storefront commercial developments soon.”

The commission voted to recommend the project despite some concern from a resident that the facility could exacerbate historical flooding issues in the area. “[Builders] will have to submit all their civil documents to public works to be able to prove that no additional water comes off after this project is done,” commissioner David Vines said during the meeting. “One of the things I made clear to the folks there is this won’t solve the flooding issue at all; it won’t make it any better; it’s just designed not to make it worse.”

Bruce said he’s hired civil-engineering firm Crafton Tull to address the flooding issue, the source reported.


1/13/16 – A self-storage proposal submitted in Owasso, Okla., by Safelock Storage was scheduled to be reviewed by officials this week. The 416-unit facility would be built on 3.9 acres on the southeast corner of East 76th Street North and North 129th East Avenue. The planning commission was scheduled to discuss the project on Monday, while the city council was scheduled to review the proposal on Tuesday.

The target property was part of a Planned Unit Development (PUD) called Penix Place approved in 2009. The PUD was 7.7 acres and included provisions for self-storage in the rear of the property and commercial offices in the front of the tract. However, none of the proposed uses were developed, and the PUD expired due to inactivity, according to city documents. The PUD submitted by Safelock includes only self-storage.

The facility would include 168 climate-controlled units and an office. Similar to the original Penix Place proposal, it would be built at the rear of the lot. Its design would include stucco or brick on any side visible to areas outside the development, according to the city-staff analysis report. The developer also envisions a commercial/retail strip along North 129th East Avenue, with an additional commercial/office tract on East 76th Street.

“While mini-storage facilities are typically not a commercial use that yields a great deal of economic benefits to the city in terms of sales tax, there is a continued need for such facilities; and as such, accommodations should be made for their appropriate placement,” staff wrote in the city analysis. “In this case, the proposed storage units are proposed to be placed near the rear of the property where retail commercial and office uses sometimes have a difficult time thriving.”

The report also notes the property is already zoned for commercial use. “In this particular case, this area is called out on the land-use plan for commercial uses; therefore, the storage facility does not deviate from the planned use identified in the 2030 Land Use Plan,” according to the report.

Sources:

TAGS: Zoning News
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