California Self-Storage Operators Partner With Kure It to Raise $1M for Cancer Research

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The California Self Storage Association (CSSA) and several of its member facilities have partnered with Kure It to raise $1 million dollars for cancer research. The organizations are working together to promote the "Store For The Kure" and "Round Up For Research" contribution programs, which aim to raise money through self-storage owners/operators and tenants.

Store for the Cure generates donations through self-storage operations by increasing street rates on all unit rentals by 50 cents per month. That 50 cents is donated to Kure It. Round Up for Research generates donations by allowing self-storage customers to voluntarily add 50 cents per month to their rental rate. Again, that 50 cents gets donated to the Kure It cause.

US Storage Centers has been effectively administering both programs for more than a year, having raised $150,000. Because all contributions are passed through as charitable donations, there is no negative impact on a facility’s net operating income. Both programs are easy to implement and track. For information on how to participate in the CSSA Kure It programs, call Kellie Newcombe at 949.428.7081.

The CSSA announced its goal of raising $1 million at its annual conference and tradeshow in San Diego, Oct. 13-16. During the event, a donated surfboard was auctioned off for $1,000, all of which went directly to the cause. The board was donated by Greg Wells of Cushman & Wakefield and Aaron Alsweiler of Storman Self Storage Software. The winning bidder was Ray Tuohy, co-founder of TNT Self Storage Management.

Kure It was created by Barry Hoeven, who was diagnosed with kidney cancer in 1998. In April 2007, Hoeven partnered with cancer center City of Hope to create the Kure It! Kidney Cancer Research Fund, which raised more than $400,000. Kure It Inc. was established in January 2010 as an independent, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Its goal is to be the leader in granting funds to cancer researchers investigating progressive treatments and cures.

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