Cornerstone Self-Storage Development Denied in Littleton, CO

A proposed self-storage development from Cornerstone Storage was rejected on Aug. 15 by the Littleton, Colo., City Council. Officials agreed with residents who opposed the project and indicated the plan didn’t fit well with the council’s long-term goals in an area known as the river corridor. Members voted 6-1 against granting a rezoning request that would have allowed industrial uses at 6505-6509 S. Santa Fe Drive, according to the source.

A proposed self-storage development from Cornerstone Storage was rejected on Aug. 15 by the Littleton, Colo., City Council. Officials agreed with residents who opposed the project and indicated the plan didn’t fit well with the council’s long-term goals in an area known as the river corridor. Members voted 6-1 against granting a rezoning request that would have allowed industrial uses at 6505-6509 S. Santa Fe Drive, according to the source.

Cornerstone intended to build two storage buildings comprising a combined 800 units. The project would have included condominium units targeted at car owners. The company had agreed to acquire the 4 acres, owned by Gary Sutton, contingent on the zoning change. Under the proposal, Cornerstone also would have expanded parking for Arapahoe Mental Health Center, which sits to the south.

“I'm not going to get into a debate about whether storage units are necessary,” councilmember Debbie Brinkman said during the meeting. “My big concern is the location. I'm quite dismayed how this is considered encouraging more creative and effective use of land.”

Councilmember Bill Hopping agreed, noting the city has spent about 20 years trying to “reclaim the river” by preventing industrial uses in the area. “People want recreation, retail, entertainment and housing,” Hopping argued. “Nothing in our plans encourages storage units.”

Councilmember Peggy Cole indicated she had received 38 e-mails from residents in opposition to the project.

The plan drew criticism from residents partially because the project would have necessitated the eviction of Donna and George Franz, who have rented a home on the property since 1962, the source reported. The home would have been razed to make room for the storage facility. “Thank goodness,” Donna Franz told the source, in reference to the council vote. “I'm glad to have a little more time. We need to solve our health issues before we try to tackle this again."

Though Sutton indicated he had received interest from other developers in the two years the land was for sale, he believed self-storage was the best fit. With Cornerstone’s project shelved, Sutton told the source he would put the land back on the market.

Sources:

TAGS: Zoning News
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