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Amy Campbell

Amy Campbell
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acampbell@vpico.com

Connecting With Local Self-Storage Customers the New York Way

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By Stacy Stuart

Having been in the self-storage industry for more than 40 years, and as a company that’s grown up exclusively in N.Y.C., we like to think we know our customers. And it shows. We were voted as New York City’s Best Self-Storage Company by New York Magazine, and our Yelp reviews are pretty fantastic!

We believe that it’s our ability to pinpoint and solve issues unique to New Yorkers that makes us the city’s chosen self-storage provider. Every storage company has a different customer base, and it’s important to identify the needs of the particular area. Identifying what matters to New Yorkers is our goal in every marketing campaign we launch. Below are four points we always stress as a New York City local storage company.  

Speak to Your Actual Customers

Communications are most effective when you truly understand the culture of your service area. New Yorkers love their city, no matter how crowded the streets, cramped the apartments or small the closets. Our communications speak to New Yorkers in their own language by calling out these “only in New York” types of experiences.

Whether it’s appealing to the city’s liberal-leaning politics , shared experiences in apartment-living, or nudging a local sports team rivalry, our ads aren't made for mass appeal. Instead, we identify problems unique to New Yorkers in communications that are specifically relevant to them, and then we provide smart storage solutions.   

Thinking Outside the Closet

Identify how people are using storage in your area, and suggest new ways to make use of storage space. Different locales may have different space needs.

We’re always finding ways to address the unique space needs of New Yorkers, helping them de-clutter and organize their apartment homes with the help of storage. For instance, because city apartments can be crowded (and New Yorkers don’t have garages), we suggest storing sports gear like surfboards and bicycles as a great way to free up space. We also suggest clearing out small, overcrowded closets with seasonal storage, because big winter jackets eat up unnecessary closet space during sweltering New York summers.

We want our customers to think of our storage spaces as extensions of their homes, instead of a place for banished or unwanted goods. We think it keeps them coming back.  

Location, Location, Location

It’s important to make storage convenient for customers, which oftentimes simply means having locations. New Yorkers never go out of their way if they can help it, which is why we consistently point to our 17 locations throughout Manhattan. There is a Manhattan Mini Storage location in almost every neighborhood, including the newly made-up ones.

With so many locations serving any customer needs, we ensure our customers won’t ever have to look more than a few blocks for a storage provider they trust.  

Quality Services

Put simply, marketing only works when there’s a good product to sell. The most important thing that defines us is our focus on quality services. Consider this: Storage facilities that are clean, secure and easily accessed are the highest customer considerations after price. A clear commitment to customers and providing the best possible service is imperative to building a strong customer base, especially in a city with plenty of self-storage providers and even more New Yorkers with stuff to store.  

Stacy Stuart is vice president of marketing at Manhattan Mini Storage. She’s been working on the infamous Manhattan Mini Storage ads for almost two decades. Her greatest joy is bringing smiles to the faces of New Yorkers and beyond.

A family-owned moving and storage company, Manhattan Mini Storage provides a full range of products and services to meet their customers’ moving and storage needs. With 17 locations in Manhattan, Manhattan Mini Storage has become the neighborhood moving and storage solution for more than 200,000 New Yorkers. Follow them on Twitter and Facebook for organizing tips, storage adventures, and New York City-isms. 

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