Two-Steppin' to Tennessee With Inside Self-Storage Expo

Amy Campbell Comments
Print
Continued from page 4

In business since 1879, Hatch Show Print (615.256.2805) is one of the oldest-known letterpress poster shops in America. Now owned and operated by the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, the print shop still uses the same techniques employed in the 15th century to create old-time posters of yesterday’s country icons and even today’s stars. Open Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Open year-round with flea markets on the weekends, Nashville Farmers’ Market (615.880.2001) features restaurants, open-air stalls, specialty shops and plenty of fresh fruits, vegetables and plants.

If you’re a military buff, Nashville has two gems for you: Fort Negley and the Military History Branch of the Tennessee State Museum. Fort Negley, adjacent to Adventure Science Center and Greer Stadium, was the largest and most important of the fortifications built by Union forces after Nashville fell during the Civil War in 1862. Built primarily by slaves and free black workers conscripted into service, Fort Negley (800.657.6910) is the largest inland stone fortification constructed during the Civil War and incorporates a complex polygonal design.

The Military Museum, located in the War Memorial Building as a tribute to veterans, features exhibits on America’s involvement in foreign wars from the Spanish American War to World War II. Exhibits showcase weapons, uniforms and battle histories. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Tennessee State Capitol (615.741.2692), located on Charlotte Avenue between 6th and 7th Avenues, has remained nearly unchanged since it was completed in 1859. Open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., the Capitol was designed by William Strickland, a noted architect and engineer who also designed the Egyptian-influenced First Presbyterian Church (now known as the Downtown Presbyterian Church). Surprising fact: Strickland is buried within the walls of the Capitol, his final work.

A Trip Back in Time

The state of Tennessee flourished during the pre-Civil War years. This is evidenced in the picturesque plantations dotting the countryside. While a number of these beautiful plantations were destroyed during the Civil War, and many more fell into disrepair over the last century, there are a handful of countryside estates still standing proudly today.

You can tour several along The Tennessee Antebellum Trail (800.381.1865), an enchanting self-guided driving tour that roams through four counties and more than 50 historic sites, such as the homes of two past presidents, including Andrew Jackson’s The Hermitage. Nestled along a scenic rural landscape, the 90-minute looping trail is a trip back in time.

Located in Centennial Park, the Parthenon (615.862.8431) was originally built for Tennessee’s 1897 Centennial Exposition. The Parthenon and the re-creation of the 42-foot statue of Athena are full-scale replicas of the Athenian originals. The Parthenon also serves as Nashville’s art museum, which includes 63 paintings by 19th- and 20th-century American artists. Open most days year-round.

For information about hotel accommodations, entertainment, special offers and more, call the Nashville Convention and Visitors Bureau at 800.657.6910; visit www.visitmusiccity.com.

Top 10 Things to Do in Nashville

1. BBQ. Need we say more?
2. Visit the Country Music Hall of Fame.
3. Take a stroll through Bicentennial Park.
4. Have lunch at the Farmer’s Market.
5. Hop aboard the General Jackson Showboat.
6. Grab a drink and enjoy live tunes on Lower Broadway.
7. Stop and smell the roses and other flora along Gaylord Opyrland’s 9 acres of lush gardens, winding paths and serene waterfalls.
8. Tour a piece of presidential history: Andrew Jackson’s home, The Hermitage.
9. See a show at The Grand Ole Opry.
10. Rejuvenate at Relâche, the Spa at Gaylord Opryland.

« Previous12345Next »
Comments
comments powered by Disqus