Records Storage: Like a Gold Mine

Cary F. McGovern Comments
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Commercial-records centers focus on larger businesses because of the volume of records per account. Iron Mountain averages several thousand boxes per account, and the local records centers average about 750 boxes per account. It takes sales efforts to go get them and the biggest accounts are already taken.

Right now there is a feeding frenzy in the industry with records centers trying to snatch accounts from each other. But why fight for business when there is so much still available?

Small businesses account for most of the business in North America and are very difficult for commercial-records centers to attack because of the cost of sales. There are a few that understand the value of the small-business clients, which, in fact, yield as much as three times the yield per box of the big corporate accounts prized by Iron Mountain and the others. You have the secret ingredient: walk-in clients.

Marketing on a local scale can be inexpensive and quite lucrative using a two-pronged approach: self-storage and records-storage at the same time.

Success in records management in self-storage can be measured in quite different terms than that of big companies because you do not have the same overhead and staffing requirements. Additionally, you can do anything the commercial-records center does by forming alliances with other small businesses right in your community.

If you’re looking for more income, look no further than your own self-storage doors. You just need to know how to mine for the gold to enjoy its glitter for a long time to come. 

Cary F. McGovern is the principal of FileMan Records Management, which offers full-service assistance for commercial records-management operations. For help with feasibility determination, operational implementation, marketing support and/or a free 90-minute consultation, call 877.FILEMAN; e-mail fileman@fileman.com; visit www.fileman.com.

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